Murders, Suicides, Unfortunate Accidents

Fowles Market/Meat/Butcher Shop

Abt 368 High St Newburyport, Ma

I believe this corner market was named Fowles or Fowlers Market. Locate It Street View Location It was a corner store with a butcher/meat market in the back.  In an unfortunate turn of events the owners son, a butcher at this market  killed himself in the back room of the store in the late 70’s.  He used a gun, not a knife ironically.   Though I never purchased meat at the store my friend Jed Ostrander and I did have frequent dialogs with the son prior to the incident.

Please help me fill in the blanks with this post!

This entry was posted on Sunday, September 20th, 2009 and is filed under Deaths W/ unusual circumstances, News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

41 Responses to “Murders, Suicides, Unfortunate Accidents”

  1. p. j. nichypor on September 24th, 2009 at 12:29 am

    At an early age I recall being intrigued by the stories I heard about the Clark murder. Apparently, a Mrs. Clark had for some reason “offed” her husband, ( obviously a “Mr. Clark”…), wrapped his lifeless body in heavy chains and other assorted weights and dumped him off the Rock’s Village bridge in West Newbury. I still conjure up sinister imagery to this day as I cross the old bridge and look down into the swirling water. Another murder involved the manager of the Port Theatre. I recall that he had a distinctive look about him. most notably were his eyes. They looked perpetually tired, with dark circle under them. He always appeared to be quite personable and always spoke to our mom when she took us to the movies. He supposedly did in his wife in later years. I don’t remember the details. As for unfortunate accidents, the one involving Jimmy C. comes to mind. Some time in the mid sixties, he had attempted to board the fishing boat “C&R”, had some how slipped and struck his head. Jimmy slid into the Merrimack and drowned… I think that he was my brother’s age and that they had been classmates and friends. I had been allowed to “tag along” with them on occasion. The river claimed the life of another southender a little further up stream. A boy whom I believe was a member of a big Irish family from Atwood Street was swimming in the river. He supposedly had jumped from the B&M railroad bridge and never surfaced. It was said that he had become caught in a tangle of old cable that lay on the river bottom. It is doubtful that the boy’s body had stretched to over ten feet in length due to the incredibly strong currents pulling at him before the divers had extricated him, as rumor had it. The plain and sad fact was that he was of normal height and was tragically dead… A second B&M property would serve as the back-drop for another unfortunate accident. The place was the fenced in, high voltage yard at March’s Hill next to the old City railroad as it was called. The structure was a collection of thick, heavy green copper wires, breakers, and huge insulators. For years, we had been warned away from it by the “danger, high voltage” signs and by the quiet and ominous “hum” you heard if you got close enough to the chain link fence. I don’t remember the boys name, nor the gruesome details. He had supposedly climbed the fence and had gotten close enough to the source of current to receive a sudden and lethal jolt of electricity. It is surprising that my friends and I survived our childhood carelessness. Most of us had tempted fate to a greater or lesser degree during our youth. Dumb-ass games with a bow and arrow or with a .22 rifle in an enclosed basement. Tunnels, ice-flows, water-towers. Over-loaded boats with no floatation devices. Yeah, we were the not too bright ones, but at least we were the lucky ones. I think back now on how those family members must have felt when they answered the knock at the door, hearing the words,”There’s been an accident”… Rest in peace Jimmy…

  2. p. j. nichypor on October 23rd, 2009 at 12:11 am

    I’m sure the bits and pieces I’d heard over the years with regard to the infamous Clark murder are a collection of loose details mixed generously with conjecture. I’d first heard of the crime while crossing the Rocks Village bridge in the back seat of my Grandmother’s Pontiac some time in the early sixties. The story that I recall was that a Mrs.Clark shot and stabbed her husband dozens of times, wrapped the corpse in heavy chains, and dumped it in the river at the bridge. Mr. Clark was reported missing and the body recovered after “dragging” the river bottom. At least that’s how I remember the tale, having heard enhanced versions at family gatherings in the ensuing years. The subject came up in a conversation with a good and long time friend of mine a month or so ago. He filled in a few of the blanks with a year, 1954 and a great name for the crime, the “Palm Sunday” murder… A little bit of hunting around for further details had me making inquiries at the Haverhill Gazette, the Haverhill Library, The Lawrence eagle Tribune, etc… All “dead” ends, ( pun intended). A trip to the Newburyport Public Library was to yield a wealth of information that would pull the decades old tidbits I had for a story, into a record of the actual events from 1954. A headline in the Daily News from June 4, 1954 read; Autopsy Shows 2 Bullet Holes In Man Found at W. Newbury… Identification Not Made: Was About 30… On the same front page was an additional headline in smaller type, it read; Melvin Clark Jr. Still Not Found… Mr. Clark had been reported missing by his family in April 11, 1954. The unidentified body that was referred to in the paper had washed ashore a mile or two down stream from the Rocks Village bridge and ended up being discovered by a bird watcher on River Rd. in W. Newbury on June 2. The corpse was reported as being severely decomposed, missing one leg, the other leg wound in a tangle of wire. Additionally, two bullet holes were found in the head, along with stab wounds to the chest. A police investigation was initiated and the body was taken to the McKinney Funeral Home in Newburyport and examined by Dr. Daniel Lyons Leary, medical examiner for the City of Newburyport. It was reported that the corpse was 5 feet 9 inches tall, had no tattoos or distinguishing marks, and weighed about 150-160 lbs. He was wearing a maroon corduroy shirt/jacket with 3 button cuffs, the only recognisable article of clothing… Bullet holes were to the left temple and in the forehead. The bullets, clothing , and vital organs were removed and were to be taken to the State Police Lab. in Boston for further examination. The victim’s body, as yet unidentified, was buried on June 4 at Walnut Hill Cemetery in W. Newbury. A wreath of flowers left on the grave and a clergyman present during the burial. A Mr. Melvin Clark Sr. of Amesbury, MA, was called in prior to the burial to attempt to identify the body as his missing son. This was to no avail. The corpse was so far decomposed and defied I.D. Police officials stated that the body may have been under water for months based on its condition. A dental match was also ruled out due to those factors. Police were also in contact with Lorraine, (Eaton) Clark, the missing man’s wife. The elder Mr. Clark had suggested “family trouble” in connection to his son’s disappearance. The Clarks lived in a small house in Amesbuy on Lake Attatash and had three children. Police stepped up their investigation and began to put together a case with Lorraine Clark as the chief suspect after piecing together bits of evidence. A .22 caliber revolver was found, remnants of blood stains were found in the Clark home. Someone had attempted to remove them by scrubbing them. A car was seized in S. Hampton that may have been used by the murderer. A small spot of blood was also found by police detectives on the roadway of the Rocks Village bridge. Milk deliveries were stopped by request of Mrs. Clark. Cement blocks were missing from a section of the foundation… Mrs. Clark finally gave police a statement and was indicted by a grand jury for the first degree murder of Melvin Clark Jr.. She re-enacted the whole grizzly crime for police, claiming she acted alone. Her statement claimed she did indeed murder her husband,bound his body with electrician’s wire, weighted him with cement blocks, and drove him to the bridge. She claims to have lifted the 150 lb corpse plus the weight of the cement blocks , into the Merrimack. She continued to claim no others assisted her with the disposal of her husband’s body. Stories of sordid parties with other couples were the talk of neighbors and associates with regard to the Clarks. She was eventually convicted of what became known as the “Palm Sunday” murder… Thanks to the Newburyport Public Library for providing the Daily News front pages that featured this information.

  3. Rita on November 29th, 2009 at 10:22 pm

    Is Lorraine still alive? Was she ever released from prison?

  4. p. j. nichypor on November 29th, 2009 at 11:39 pm

    I heard, that Mrs. Clark is still alive and was released from prison not too long ago. I will research this… Pretty sure she was convicted of second degree murder. It was believed that she had an accomplice, but denied it in court and took the rap herself. The murder took place 55 years ago. She was in her early to mid twenties then which puts her in her late seventies now. There isn’t much relevant info on the Internet with regard to this notorious crime. I will check the usual sources, ( people who were around then and followed the case…).

  5. Todd B on January 21st, 2010 at 2:51 pm

    What about the florist who was murdered in his own home, Welch, I think his name was. I think it was on Oak Street. I remember him, several times a year when family members needed flowers, they would buy them from him, And he would come by the house for the next few weeks, and collect what you could afford to pay this week towards the bill, etc. Lots of local folks did business that way back then. Any way I think the killer(s) thought he kept lots of cash in his home or something, or at least I think that was what people were saying at the time he was killed. I believe he was hanged. This was probably the mid to late 70’s.

    I remember the guy from the theater who later killed his wife, that was probably around 1990 or so. Gurney I think his name was, he also worked for the Daily New for a number of years.

    The there was the young girl Karen, who was murdered on the railroad tracks off State Street, I’d say early 80’s.

  6. Chanson on February 21st, 2010 at 4:00 pm

    I remember that there were 2 murders on State St around 1983. The first victim was an elderly lady who lived in the small 2 story house 2 doors up from the Fruit Basket. I remember hearing that the murderer lived in that area and that he killed a woman named Karen soon after killing the elderly lady. I was 9 or 10 at the time so it made an impression since I lived near by. Karen was young and I think she was found in the pit off of the bunny trail. The guy was arrested and put in jail. These incidents were the end of us riding bikes on the bunny trail.

  7. Marie on June 24th, 2010 at 1:48 am

    Does anyone know information about Pamela (Pam) Atwood of Church St, W. Newbury’s drowing in the early 1970’s? Her body was supposedly found in the M.R. @ Rock’s Neck Bridge

  8. Marie on June 24th, 2010 at 9:39 pm

    With regard to my request for info on Pam
    Atwood’s drowing, you may need the following information:

    approx. d/o/d 06/1973
    body found on Christoferson’s dock on Church St, W. Newbury
    did make front page headline in the Nbpt Daily News, which read “West Newbury Woman Feared Drowned.” Headline appeared prior to authorities finding the body.

    We have unsuccessfully been able to find info in newspaper archives. Have you run across any info in your research at the Library?

    loupes@verizon.net

  9. Dmsouther on June 26th, 2010 at 7:07 am

    As for the the kid who died at marches hill it was john abraham and it was terrence connors off the bm bridge and jim koulouras on the c and r whitch was ajso the taxi cab co. Both were owned by Shinner. Stevens

  10. brownwey on July 22nd, 2010 at 12:34 am

    Here’s a article in Life Magazine in 1954 with two pictures of Lorraine Clark, called “Murder on the Merrimac,” on page 26. As my brother said Amesbury was a real Peyton Place back then!

    http://books.google.com/books?id=BFQEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA26&dq=lorraine%20clark%20amesbury&as_pt=MAGAZINES&pg=PA26#v=onepage&q&f=true

  11. Shawn G - Moderator on July 22nd, 2010 at 11:12 pm
  12. brownwey on July 24th, 2010 at 6:49 pm

    One lead leads to another – Another archived Google document – nice source for these things. Melvin was a foreman at an electrical company in Newburyport. This would likely be Chase Shawmut, which my sister, brother, and I all worked at once in our life – didn’t everyone in Newburyport!! The piece below was part of a series of true life dramas written by Ellery Queen – the that’s right the novelist who wrote novels with clues to help the reader identify the culprit before the end. Ellery Gueen was also a popular TV series in the 70’s starring Tim Hutton, who played Ellery. . . here’s the piece:

    http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=wGAzAAAAIBAJ&sjid=kBAEAAAAIBAJ&dq=newburyport%20lorraine-clark&pg=5957%2C2316483

    I have to say – wouldn’t this make a great movie?

  13. Bonnie Hayes on September 6th, 2010 at 10:26 am

    Chanson–I was looking for info on the murders you wrote about–Karen was my ex-husband’s girlfriend, she was murdered by her best friend’s husband after discovering he had killed an elderly woman and stolen her rings–my ex was initially blamed for it until the murderer’s wife told police what she knew. Or at least that’s my ex’s story–he was 17 at the time, and now suffers from memory loss and confusion, I was curious to find out the true details.

  14. George on October 23rd, 2010 at 12:34 am

    The Lorraine Clark muder case was not all as it seemd. I know because the trile unfolded all around me as a young man. For one thing, she was protecting her children and another thing her lover. The true story is far more interesting than what was reported back then. She was a very beautiful woman as Melvin was handsome.
    There was more to the so calld wife swapping parties also. Amesbury was a quiet town back then, that did not want all the reporters from all over the country, invaiding there lives and town for good reason.

  15. George on October 27th, 2010 at 12:30 am

    To p.j. nichypor Lorraine was released from Framingham Womans prison in Mass, in the spring of 1963 after serving 9 1/2 years. She is alive and doing well. She still lives in Amesbury, Mass. She did not act alone, if even she did the murder. Her lover, who’s last name was Jackson from Haverhill, Mass. was held by the police for a time and on his relese at the time, got out of the country. The main reason they let him go, was the fact that Lorraine gave a statement that she alone did the murder. This was a false statement on her part. When she found out he left the country to South America and did not care what happend to her, she gave a new statement, saying she did not do it but it was too late, for Jackson was out of the country, thus he could not be tried for the murder. Most of all, they wanted to drag her children into the trile.Something she did not want to happen. Thus a confession. As far as the wife swapping parties, there were many prominent people from the area that took part in them and it did not just stop with men and woman having sex. No wonder there was a rash of divorce’s all around the Amesbury area after the trial. The summer and fall of 1954, Amesbury was loaded with reporters from all over the country. Something the town or its people did not welcome. There is so very much more to this story, that hardly anyone knows.I have been told to write a book about it in the past and i just might, We will see.,

  16. g.crispo on November 18th, 2010 at 8:41 am

    Terry Connors and Johnny Abraham were friends of mine; Terry was walking the railing horsing around and fell and didn’t come up. Johnny was cilmbing the high tension tower and didn’t know all you had to do is get close to the wire to get electricuted. I grew up on Plum Island, we saw people die at least once a year, we learned early that life was not a safe place.
    On a brighter note we enjoyed making the kids in school jealous when we got called to leave early because the school buses had to beat the high tide.

  17. Murder Isn’t The Only Red Scare At Orgies In The 50′s – Silent Porn Star on December 10th, 2010 at 1:30 pm

    […] be convicted and sentenced to life, but she was freed in 1963. “George,” a commenter at NBPTMA.comwho says he was a young man living in Amesbury when all this went down, says there’s more to […]

  18. p nichypor on April 11th, 2012 at 1:56 pm

    In the early 60s, there was a drowning at Curzon mill. I believe it was on the Merrimac River side of the bridge and old dam, at the mouth of the Artichoke River. My Uncle Bob,( Dennis) and Aunt Alice, (Kilgore/Dennis)had told me about it. I’m at a loss for the name of the poor soul after so many years. The story was that he was fishing those waters and wearing old style “waders”, (hip-boots) and ventured too far and too deep. The grisly details were that the waders filled with water and began dragging him down into the swirling tide waters. Apparently, the boots then had no “quick release” mechanism. Despite his cries for help, he was eventually dragged under, the waders having become weights. A resident , not too far away, claimed that she thought someone was playing a radio loudly… She ignored the sounds because they suddenly stopped… I always felt a little uneasy any time I ventured to the old mill and looked out into the murkiness of the confluence of the two rivers. That dreadful accident was a part of the many legends and stories we grew up with in an age before electronic life-lines and digital toys. Our thoughts were our own. And the simpler times, though intermingled with disturbing tragedies like this, were non-the-less more life shaping and real it seems, than now. I still go back to the places I walked or rode my bike to and played in and around Newburyport so many years ago. With a little imagination and remembrance, I can go back to a moment in time where I’m wearing a pair of canvas sneakers, patched dungarees, and a striped jersey without a care in the world… To me, those were better times.

  19. Joe McLaughlin on May 1st, 2012 at 10:59 pm

    You missed a few. There was a murder on the corner of pleasant & summer , also a night watchmen at Towle Silver that got a ice pick in the heart when a couple of guys broke in. Circa 50’s.

  20. DM Jones on January 11th, 2013 at 11:03 am

    The State Street murders mentioned earlier took place in 1982, not 1983. The young woman who was murdered was Karen Elizabeth Crooks, born January 11, 1963. The murderer, whose name is Peyton, was convicted of both crimes. Karen knew that Peyton murdered the elderly woman and had told me this information, then Karen had disappeared. Karen’s body was found near the old railroad tracks near State Street in Newburyport.

  21. krm on May 23rd, 2013 at 11:00 pm

    How about the murder of Mel Pratt in Newbury, and the murder of Bob Sadewski down on PI. The two were unrelated. Sadewski was married, lived in Latham, NY, but dating Jane McNeal at PJ’s. Some guy used to go in to PJ’s and decided Jane was for him and not for Sadoewski so he lurked in the dunes until Sadewski came along and shot him dead.

  22. krm on May 23rd, 2013 at 11:06 pm

    The murder of Welchie the Florist on Oak St. back in the 70’s was big news. I went to the trial. Every night Welch used to feed his cats lobster meat. He’d go to his door and call the cats to feed them. He called the local locksmith, Link, to come make a new key or something so he could open a strong box he had. It had money in it and when it was opened, the locksmith’s eyes popped out. Then he told some unsavory characters, Wayne Hicks, and “Timer” Witham. One other that I can’t remember. They went to Welchie’s house, made a sound like a cat, Welchie opened the door, and bam! They got inside, tied him up in an electrical cord, and proceeded to go through the house. The cops knew they stole a safe because they could see the wheel marks in the dust in the house. They killed Welch. Then, (it doesn’t get any dumber than this), they took the moldy smelling money to the drive-up window at a local bank. The smell was a dead giveaway. The teller called the cops, everyone in town knew the crooks, so 2 +2 = Wayne Hicks. Game over.

  23. s. b. acoulon on July 2nd, 2013 at 4:45 pm

    just finished reading “Diary of the Depths” (1972) by Robert Ellis Cahill who recounts the divers’ search during a secret probe for evidence in the Lorraine Clark’s murder. They did recover some of the articles that had been implicated in the murder, one of the knitting needles, a clove used in the murder. It involved attorney Frank Leary and reporter Jack O’Shea from the Boston Traveler. There was “no bill” indictment regarding a Mr. X who was thought to have committed the murder.

  24. Ron Greene on July 31st, 2013 at 9:16 pm

    For “p nichypor on April 11th, 2012 at 1:56 pm” re: the drowning at Curzon Mill in the ’60s. The boy who drowned was Bart (Barty) Colby who lived in Pine Hill Road. I heard back then that he had played hookey from school that day (He was a couple years older than me, ~15 years old) and was duck hunting. He shot a duck and proceeded to wade into the Merrimac to get it. The waders filled up and poor kid drowned. I remember watching them (fire dept??) in boats with grappling hooks searching for the body near the chain bridge at the end of Spofford Street where I lived. That’s a pretty long way from Curzon Mill to the chain bridge, but the Merrimac had a fierce current. I learned to swim in it, I know. Polluted as it was back then!

  25. Marie nellson on August 13th, 2013 at 8:49 pm

    The other man in the florists murders was Joe Marshall… he is deceased..Died at Concord State prison maybe 10 yrs ago… He was married at one time to a relative of mine…he committed this after they had divorced.

  26. Karon on August 16th, 2013 at 11:37 pm

    I remember when Johnny Abraham was killed. I was a little kid living in the southend going to the I.C. when that happened. Like many we steered clear of that area while sledding down Marches Hill.

    Do any of you old timers remember the two kids that went off the Andrew Gillis Memorial Bridge in their car? They didn’t quite make the bridge opening. On the front page of the Daily News was the picture of the car being pulled up with two bodies hanging out. That would have been mid to late 70’s.

    I am an alumni of NHS class of 1985 and we also had an unfortunate accident happen to one of our girls who played hookie from school. Annette Bowman drowned in a boating accident in 1983 – we dedicated our yearbook to her. I remember that day VERY CLEARLY. We were all devastated for her sister Holly.

  27. Shawn G - Moderator on August 17th, 2013 at 1:02 am

    Hi Karon – I went to Sunday School with Robin Bowman as well as RA Nock Middle school. That was sad when Annette drowned. Thanks for the history. This is exactly the history we are looking for!

  28. Marie nellson on August 28th, 2013 at 9:17 pm

    The kids who went off the bridge was jeff farmer and a thone, cant remember his first name .. 1979 I think.

  29. Shelly on September 19th, 2013 at 12:15 am

    I realize this is before the realm of what you guys are discussing, but can anyone give me any information about the dead brothers laid out in this photograph? It was taken probably around 1900 and the photographer was from Newburyport.

  30. Suzi B on September 26th, 2013 at 8:14 pm

    I find it interesting to read about these murders. Lorraine Clark, I knew. My best friend and I would go to their home to go swimming as they were a friend of her dads.
    I never knew who had done Welchie. I just remember it happening. I had moved out of town by then. I came upon this site by trying to find out more info one the Phil Kantowich murder as the details of that are vague to me, it happened so long ago.
    A couple of drownings that were missed: Meridith Woods drowned in the Artichoke in the 40’s. She had lived on Low St. Another was Tommy Jackson who was swimming at the foot of Jefferson St. He went under and never came up. That was in the early 50’s. If we had permission from home, we were released from school and all hiked to Green St to attend visiting hours.
    I remember the Towle murder. It was planned by someone who thought that he was going to get out of jail, with his buddy who did. The buddy went ahead and did the robbery and killed the watchman. There was also a drowning that happened at Plum Island around 58-59.Two buddies were together in a boat, I think and one fell out and his body was never recovered.
    For a small town,city there have been quite a few happen.
    Another drowning that happened in the Stevens family was early in the century. A boat capsized off shore and some drowned. I never paid much attention when the story was told, but because of that, there was an inate fear of water. I was wondering if maybe the 2 brothers might have been them. It was my grandmothers generation and she lost a few siblings in that one.

  31. grandchild of Lorraine on January 14th, 2014 at 11:45 am

    If Lorraine Clark were to tell the whole story today, she would have received little to no time in prison. As it is, 9.5 years seems a little too short for murdering your husband due to infidelities doesn’t it? People in charge knew what really happened and took pity on her which is why she did not receive a harsher sentence. They also supported her in not speaking the truth since she was trying to protect her children. There is way more to this story than will ever be known by the public. It is truly a shame that she has had to live with the secrets of this tragedy, but she protected her children in the best way possible at that time and to this day won’t tell anyone all of the details. Because of this crime her children were treated poorly and for many many years she lived away from her family so that she would not bring shame on them. The newspapers got it wrong, ellery queen got it wrong. If there is one thing that i hope to see before my life is over it will be to see her name cleared, if not of the murder, than of the reason for the crime. At this time there are still too many family members alive who this would hurt, which is why no one has ever tried to change the story. I am sure to many people it is interesting, but to Lorraine, the children and the families it involved it is just a very painful memory. What amazes me is how far out the stories became, it is almost as if people were more interested in coming up with the most sordid story they could than they were in reporting the truth. I suppose when you have an accused person refusing to speak about the crime then that is what happens, people make a story up to suit their fantasies. Lorraine has lived a very long and full life, as she deserves, and is loved and respected by all of her family.

  32. Shawn G - Moderator on February 2nd, 2014 at 12:28 am

    Thank you for your comment to your grandmother’s story. If there is more to the story she should tell it. It’s 2014 and most people even locally wouldn’t care either way. If there is a different story, then the truth should be told. No one should take the rap for an eternity. Thanks again!

    Shawn

  33. DL Fowler on March 3rd, 2014 at 1:59 pm

    Some guys at a local club were talking about the Karen crooks murder and we were trying to figure out the name of the elderly woman murdered in connection to her, Does anybody have this info

  34. Danmsouther on March 5th, 2014 at 2:04 am

    I remember Steven Wingfield who was hit by a car on storey ave back in the late 70’s. We were running away from home (as we have all did when we were kids and always came home a few hours later our parents never even knew we ran away lol.) we were running across the street across from mr k’s it was dark and Steven was hit by a Volkswagen bus.I can still remember it like it was last night. I was very young and was visited by the state police a couple of days later. I was scared to death I thought I was in big trouble so I hid in my bedroom closet. They question me for a couple of hours never been so scared in my whole entire life. RIP Steve .

  35. Lance Roberts Wingfield on August 9th, 2014 at 7:44 pm

    Steven Wingfield was my cousin. I was just at his mother’s/my aunt’s funeral today. One of the sweetest woman I new. I was only 2 years old when Steven died. So I only new him by the pictures I’ve seen.

  36. Andrew on January 26th, 2015 at 7:47 pm

    It’s nice to see another grandchild of Lorraine writing here! Are you biologically related or by marriage? I’m not her biological grandchild, but when she married Bob my biological grandmother had already passed on so she was the only grandmother I knew, and what a wonderful grandmother she was. When my grandfather died, there was some sort of rift that I wasn’t privy to between his kids and Nana Lorraine, so I never saw her again and I still miss her and think of her often. Every Thanksgiving, especially, because she knew I loved her turkey soup and would drive to my parents house to bring it to me. The woman I know is wonderful, and although I never spoke with her about this issue, I can say with conviction that there is more to the story than what was reported in the papers of the time.

  37. Grandchild of Lorraine on June 27th, 2015 at 7:49 pm

    My Nana is a wonderful lady who survived a very tragic situation. If the same events had happened today she would never have been imprisoned, Melvin would have. The abuse was unthinkable. She was a very brave woman, who did what she needed to do to protect her family. The stories about this event I find on line make me very sad. There is so little truth to them, other than he was murdered, which he rightly deserved. Her true story will never be told. Scars still remain and the wounds would be reopened. Nothing good could come of it. Knowing that she is able to live her life, have happiness, see her children, and grand children marry, and now getting to meet her great grandchildren is enough.

  38. Holly Reardon on July 31st, 2015 at 8:04 am

    Thank you to the person that remembered my twin sister Annette Bowman. We were in a boating accident in 1983. Also the yearbook dedication I will never forget. Missing her everyday.

  39. Karon on August 21st, 2015 at 10:32 pm

    Dear Holly, I can only imagine your sadness. Both of you were always so nice to me in high school. I wish only happiness and fond memories of Annette.

  40. Jeffrey on January 10th, 2016 at 12:27 am

    Does anyone have any information about the murder mentioned in the first reply, supposedly perpetrated by a former manager of the port theatre? Any information would be much appreciated.

  41. GB on January 22nd, 2017 at 9:07 am

    Conners was jumping off the bridge swimming. Got caught on something.every one use to do it.My mother included.
    Karen was 16 had home issues. Stayed with people on oatis place. Helped take care of the kids there. I forget the women’s name but she was the one that cleaned all the shops down town her husband raped and killed Karen (at the house)and dumped her at the tracks . I think her last name was cook or cooks. She was a beautiful young quiet kid who just wanted to have a good happy home life. She was my friend.
    Welchy the florist. To steel what he kept in his safe the caved his head in. I never heard about a hanging but his head was caved in they beat him to death.

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“By 1970, economic decline left much of the downtown slated for demolition. Ann Ormond, president of the Greater Newburyport Chamber of Commerce, noted it took many dedicated people, including the then-mayor Byron Matthews, to stop the wrecking balls...”
by Sarah Sanford Newbury Port

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